Toggle High
Contrast On
Categories
Body icon
Body
We celebrate all shapes and sizes because we see nothing but beauty.
View Topic
Life icon
Life
GR8NESS isn’t something you do; it’s how you live.
View Topic
Mind icon
Mind
Infuse mindfulness and awareness into everything you do.
View Topic
Self Care icon
Self Care
Refresh, renew, and reconnect with your inner self to nurture your wellbeing.
View Topic
Soul icon
Soul
Connect with all of humanity and discover your true self.
View Topic
Body
We celebrate all shapes and sizes because we see nothing but beauty.
View More
Categories
A life in motion is a life well lived. Move. Discover. Grow.
View Topic
True health lies in finding the perfect balance of mind, body, and spirit.
View Topic
Chronic pain can be debilitating. Regain control of your body and mind.
View Topic
Remedies sourced from nature help heal pains, both seen and unseen.
View Topic
Feed your body properly and you’ll nurture more than just the physical.
View Topic
Life
GR8NESS isn’t something you do; it’s how you live.
View More
Categories
Ease the way you move through life with simplicity and intelligence.
View Topic
Strengthening your relationships helps you celebrate who you’ve become.
View Topic
Raising children is the job of a lifetime. And you never get to retire.
View Topic
Our planet is a marvelous gift. Become the change the world needs by helping it heal.
View Topic
They’re an extended part of your family. Care for them the way they deserve.
View Topic
Mind
Infuse mindfulness and awareness into everything you do.
View More
Categories
While you cannot escape the stresses of life, you can find shelter inside yourself.
View Topic
Calming anxiety, easing depression, and discovering peace of mind are within your grasp.
View Topic
Everyday tools, training, and techniques to convince your brain it can be so much more.
View Topic
From mantras for self-love to changing the way you look at wellness.
View Topic
category alt tag
Self Care
Refresh, renew, and reconnect with your inner self to nurture your wellbeing.
View More
Categories
The journey of self-discovery is never-ending. Embrace your journey.
View Topic
Feeling good about your outside impacts how you feel about your inside. Feel beautiful both ways.
View Topic
Soul
Connect with all of humanity and discover your true self.
View More
Categories
Dive into your practice and experience something new every day. Give your mind some space to grow.
View Topic
Feed your mind with powerful positive statements to help you believe in yourself.
View Topic
In a fast-paced world, sometimes the best thing you can do is to breathe.
View Topic
GR8NESS expert Expert Reviewed
people protesting
137 Views
5 Min Read Time
0 Shares

9 Moments in History that Inspired Change

GR8NESS RATING
2
gr8 vote
GR8
0
meh vote
MEH
0
pass vote
PASS

Why does social change happen when it does? Societies have a particular order, but at certain moments in time, this order becomes susceptible to change. Sometimes the moments are small, the catalyst a seemingly ordinary person. Other times they are big, led by a groundswell of momentum. Either way, certain important historical events have been inspired by specific moments in history.

Some changes come fast, and some come incrementally. But all change comes from moments that act as a catalyst for change as the universe bends toward justice. Whether it was the civil rights movement, the gay rights movement, or resistance against apartheid, strength and dedication marked these efforts and inspired change throughout the world.

Rosa Parks & the Montgomery Bus Boycott (1955)

rosa parks

The Montgomery Bus Boycott began after the arrest of Rosa Parks for refusing to give up her seat to a white male passenger. The next day, Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr called for a citywide bus boycott to protest racial segregation in the bus system. African Americans boycotted the buses and would either walk or share rides to their destinations.

The boycott lasted for 381 days, ending in June 1956, when a federal court ruled that the laws that kept buses segregated were unconstitutional. The U.S. Supreme Court eventually ruled against the Montgomery bus system, and the buses became desegregated. The boycott was one of the first movements to bring about social change.

Ruby Bridges and the McDonough Three (1960)

ruby bridges

These four girls were the first African American students to integrate white elementary schools in New Orleans, Louisiana. Tessie Provost, Leona Tate, and Gail Etienne arrived at McDonough No. 19, an all-white segregated school on November 14, 1960. On the same day, Ruby Bridges integrated another New Orleans, William Frantz Elementary.

Although school segregation had been illegal since 1956, many areas were slow to change. Due to public protests, the girls were accompanied by Federal Marshalls throughout the entire year. As they moved through the school system, they continued to integrate schools.

March on Washington (1963)

martin luther king

Attended by an estimated 200,000 to 300,000 people, the 1963 March on Washington was the largest political rally for human rights in the U.S. The march was organized to protest for jobs for African Americans and was the site of Martin Luther King, Jr’s famous “I Have a Dream” speech, given from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. This march is credited with helping to pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

National Organization for Women (1966)

national organization of women

Founded on June 30, 1966, the National Organization for Women (NOW) was formed by a group of activists led by Betty Friedan with the goal of ending sex discrimination. Inspired by the Civil Rights movement, the women brainstormed an action plan to enforce Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which bars employers from discriminating against employees based on race, sex, color, nationality, and religion. Today, the organization is the largest organization using grassroots efforts to push for social change.

Stonewall Riots (June 28, 1969)

stonewall riots

Although not the beginning of the gay rights movement, the Stonewall Riots were a turning point for LGBT+ political activism. It began with a police raid on the Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village. The police entered the bar, roughed up the patrons, and arrested 13 people for bootlegged liquor (the bar was a private bottle club) and for violating the state’s gender-appropriate clothing statute.

Fed up with social discrimination and constant police harassment, angry neighborhood residents and patrons gathered outside the bar rather than dispersing. As the crowd became agitated and the police began manhandling people into police vans, a lesbian shouted at the crowd to act, inciting a riot and protests that lasted five days. This was the catalyst for the formation of numerous gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender civil rights organizations.

Candy Lightner: Stood up against Drunk Driving (1980)

Candy Lightner

When a repeat DWU offender hit and killed her 13-year-old daughter Cari, Candy Lightner founded the group Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) on March 7, 1980. Prior to the founding of MADD, there were very few legal consequences for driving under the influence of alcohol. The organization changed how Americans thought about drunk driving and successfully tightened DUI/DWI laws throughout the country.

Nelson Mandela Released from Prison (1990)

Mandela devoted his life to eradicating apartheid in South Africa, a policy that kept white and black South Africans apart and deprived black citizens the right to vote. In 1964 he was put in prison for his aggressive opposition to the racist policy and imprisoned for 26 years. He was released in 1990 and elected president of the Black African Congress. He won a Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts to end apartheid in 1993.

Lilly Ledbetter: Fought for Equal Pay (2009)

lilly ledbetter

Just prior to her retirement from Goodyear after 19 years, Lilly Ledbetter learned that she had been earning thousands less per month than her male counterparts. She successfully sued the company, but the judgment was reversed on appeal. The Supreme Court upheld the appeal on the grounds that she did not file her suit within 180 days from the date of the policy that led to her reduced paycheck. In response, Congress passed the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009 that changed federal law to better protect women in the workplace.

Malala Yousafzai: Fights for Better Education for Women (2012)

Malala Yousafzai

Known around the world simply as Malala, the Pakistani native is an activist for female education and the youngest Nobel Prize laureate. She learned about the importance of education from her father, who taught at a girls’ school. When her town was taken over by the Taliban in 2008, they banned girls from going to school. Malala publicly denounced the policy and was shot in the head for voicing her beliefs. After recovering, Malala and her family moved to the United Kingdom, where she started the Malala Fund, a charity devoted to ensuring all girls have the chance to get an education.

GR8NESS RATING
2
gr8 vote
GR8
0
meh vote
MEH
0
pass vote
PASS
Stephany
GR8NESS Writer
Stephany is a GR8NESS Contributing Editor who writes about pet care, CBD, stress, self care, meditation, time management, brain training, and natural remedies with a focus on the science behind it all. She has three dogs, three cats, walks half marathons, and practices yoga and powerlifting. You can often find her training her dogs or experimenting with new flavors in the kitchen.
Learn More
Related Articles
GR8NESS expert Expert Reviewed
Image by Julia Raasch / Unsplash

22 Alternatives to Trick or Treating This Halloween

When it comes to Halloween 2020, things are going to be a little different than we're used to this year. The tradition of trick or treating is still continuing, depending on where you live. Some towns and cities have decided to press pause on the activity this year, while others...
GR8NESS expert Expert Reviewed
races united

12 Documentaries & Books to Learn about US Race Relations

Recent protests are less about specific police-involved deaths, although they are certainly the catalyst, but more about 400 years of systemic racism and oppression. If you don't experience it, it's easy to think that racism doesn't exist or that it's a minor issue. The recent unlawful deaths and protests tell...
GR8NESS expert Expert Reviewed
Image by LightField Studios / Shutterstock

How to Talk to Kids about Racial Injustice & Human Rights

With events unfolding around the world, it is more important than ever to learn how to talk to your child about race, human rights, and injustice. As the topic of civil rights is front and center, kids may have a hard time understanding what they see on the news or...
GR8NESS expert Expert Reviewed
Image by Olena Yakobchuk / Shutterstock

5 Ways to Finding Your Zen in Our Crazy World

Whether you're scrolling through social media on your phone or watching the news on TV, the constant swirl of pandemic and protest headlines can feel overwhelming at times. We're all coping with the stress and anxiety brought on by the pandemic, and the deep pain that has been brought to...
The URL has been copied